The Proof is in the Paperwork: How Trying to Evict a Tenant Without Proper Notice Can Damage a Landlord

If you are a landlord and a tenant has violated his lease; but, refuses to leave, you want them removed as quickly as possible to restart positive cash flow. This is an issue that unfortunately many landlords face, and unless the landlord is well-versed with the Landlord Tenant Act, it can be a bigger problem than anticipated.

Here is a typical scenario: A tenant who has failed to pay rent, has also moved-in a roommate and their 4 dogs. The infuriated landlord, decides to post a typical 3-day notice for non-payment of rent and files his own eviction action.  However, what the landlord fails to realize is that, although a 3-day notice is required for non-payment of rent, a 7-day notice to cure is required for the roommate and the 4 dogs.

On the eve of the final hearing, the slick tenant then pays the rent in cash, which the landlord puts in his pocket saying he’ll see his tenant in court because the landlord still wants the tenant removed due to the roommate and dogs. The result? The landlord’s eviction action will likely be dismissed for failure to post a 7-day notice, and for accepting the rental payment. This scenario requires the landlord to start over: post a 7-day notice, amend the eviction action, and attend a second hearing, thus elongating the entire process and costing more money.

Mackey Law Group is well versed in landlord-tenant actions and can effectively assist in either defending a wrongful eviction, or swiftly navigating the court system to evict a tenant the right way. If you are having an issue with a tenant or a landlord, consider calling Mackey Law Group today.

By: Drew Chesanek, Esq.